Career assessments and inventories

Career assessments and inventories assist individuals in discovering and understanding their interests, skills, abilities, and personalities and in clarifying their career goals.  The assessments are useful tools to help you gain self-knowledge and explore occupations and majors. Lists of occupations are based on statistics and are only examples of careers that may be a good fit. The occupations are not recommendations.

The Career Center uses the following assessments:

FOCUS 2

FOCUS 2 is an online, self-guided, career planning tool that enables users to complete self-assessments and explore occupations and majors. This tool is free to Missouri State students and alumni. To create an account, you will need your Missouri State email address and access code. Contact the Career Center to obtain your access code.

We encourage you to make an appointment with a career counselor to discuss your results and next steps.

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®)

Career counselors use the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® to assist individuals in understanding their personality preferences and identifying job families and occupations that may be a good fit for their MBTI type.

The MBTI® was developed by Isabel Myers and Katharine Briggs as a measure of Dr. Carl Jung's theory of psychological types. Results provide individuals with information on career options, potential strengths associated with their type, and career management strategies.

Strong Interest Inventory®

The Strong Interest Inventory® (Strong) measures career interests and connects them to potential careers.

It is based on the work of E. K. Strong, Jr., who originally published his inventory on the measurement of interests in 1927. Career counselors often use this inventory to help people clarify their interests and career decisions. The Strong assessment measures your level of interest in six career themes: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional (RIASEC). It also measures your personal style and occupational compatibility  

Multiple Intelligences Checklist

The Multiple Intelligences Checklist evolved from research done by Howard Gardner, Ph.D. The checklist is designed to evaluate the way a person thinks and learns based on life experiences in childhood and the present time. Strengths are identified and associated with nine intelligences, and sample professions are listed under each intelligence area. 

Skills Activities

Skills are acquired through life experiences such as education, work, and volunteer services. Every job requires certain skills. Discovering and developing skills is essential to career success. The Career Center has a variety of skills exercises, including SkillScan and other activities to help students identify the skills they have and most enjoy using. Skills can be the foundation upon which we are likely to develop our careers. Students also learn to evaluate how well their skills match the skills needed in various jobs.

Work Values Checklists

Work values are often the determining factors when making career decisions. Values checklists ask students to prioritize the aspects of work life that are necessary for their achieving career satisfaction. Work values include helping others, leadership, creativity, security, and adventure, to name a few. Results show clearly that when students explore occupational choices, they should consider the value they place on certain conditions within a workplace.