Recommended reading on career development topics

Major in Success: Make College Easier, Fire Up Your Dreams, and Get A Great Job
By Patrick Combs and Jack Canifield

With so much at stake during college, students need smart and inspiring advice to help them excel. Now in its fifth edition, Major In Success reaches out to undecided freshmen and sophomores in search of a major that suits their interests and career ambitions; shows near-graduation students how to bolster their résumé and ace the interview to land their first real job; and presents innovative strategies for tackling the six biggest fears that hold students back.

Revised edition of the best-selling guide for college students looking to discover their passion and make the most of their college years. Includes updated resources and websites, the latest job market research, and new student success stories. Named a "Best Book" by the New York Public Library. Previous editions have sold more than 120,000 copies.

What Color Is Your Parachute? A Practical Manual for Job Hunters and Career-Changers
By Richard N Bolles

“How many jobs are out there, in this economy?” “Where do I go from here with my life?”

These are some of the questions at the forefront of the modern job-searcher’s mind. And they are thoroughly and thoughtfully answered with all-new chapters in the 2011 edition of What Color Is Your Parachute?, the best-selling job-hunting book in the world for more than three decades--in good times and bad. A longtime fixture on best-seller lists, What Color Is Your Parachute? features life-saving information that is updated each year to cater to the specific requirements of today’s job market.

Career guru Richard N. Bolles leads job-searchers to find meaningful work. He asks, WHAT skills do you most love to use? WHERE--in what field--would you most love to use them? And HOW do you find such jobs without depending on agencies, ads, and online postings?

This book is not only about finding a job in hard times, it’s also about finding your passion. In the words of Fortune magazine:
“Parachute remains the gold standard of career guides.”

Your On Your Own (But I'm Here If You Need Me): Mentoring Your Child During The College Years
By Marjorie Savage

Parents whose kids are away at college have a tough tightrope to walk: they naturally want to stay connected to their children, yet they also need to let go. What's more, kids often send mixed messages: they crave space, but they rely on their parents' advice and assistance. Not surprisingly, it's hard to know when it's appropriate to get involved in your child's life and when it's better to back off.

You're On Your Own (But I'm Here If You Need Me) helps parents identify the boundaries between necessary involvement and respect for their child's independence. Marjorie Savage, who as a parent herself empathizes with moms and dads, but who as a student services professional understands kids, offers advice on wide-ranging issues.

The Parent's Crash Course In Career Planning: Helping Your College Student Succeed
By Maria B Harris and Sharon L Jones

From freshman orientation through senior year, this book addresses career planning: what parents and students should do. Learn about current career trends, job options, choosing a major and career, and conducting a job search to land a satisfying and rewarding job.

Don't Tell Me What To Do, Just Send Money: The Essential Parenting Guide to the College Years
By Helen E Johnson and Christine Schelhas-Miller

Parenting a college-bound student is a tricky business--combining your emotional and financial support with your child's newfound independence can seem nearly impossible. The authors of Don't Tell Me What to Do, Just Send Money are all too familiar with these difficulties and have created a practical guide that addresses specific situations and provides effective guidelines for changing the parent-child relationship. Topics are addressed frankly, and many parents may have trouble reading the sections concerning controversial subjects such as drug and alcohol use, birth control, homosexuality, and changes in religious and political beliefs. The emphasis here is not on changing your kid's mind about any of these things, but rather how parents can approach these sensitive topics while maintaining a positive and honest relationship. Most pages contain small text boxes highlighting what's on your mind and what's on your child's mind, as well as practical lists suggesting what to do and what to avoid, and these can be extremely helpful as a quick reference when faced with a sudden announcement from your student who's decided to change majors, stop living in the dorm, or study abroad.

Letting Go: A Parents' Guide To Understanding The College Years
By Karen Levin Coburn and Madge Lawrence Treeger

For more than a decade Letting Go has provided hundreds of thousands of parents with valuable insights, information, comfort, and guidance throughout the emotional and social changes of their children's college years—from the senior year in high school through college graduation. Based on real-life experience and recommended by colleges and universities around the country, this indispensable book has been updated and revised, offering even more compassionate, practical, and up-to-the-minute information.

When Your Kids Goes To College: A Parents' Survival Guide
By Coral Barkin

You've taught them how to do their laundry, brought them a year's supply of toothpaste and shampoo, and lectured them on the do's and dont's of life beyond your home. The time has come for your child to leave for college — but are you prepared to say goodbye?

Written by a mother who survived the perils of packing her own child off to school, When Your Kid Goes to College provides supportive, reassuring, and helpful tips for handling this inevitable but difficult separation.